Air Force, Calhoun agree to contract extension
Feb. 3, 2016

Air Force athletics and head coach Troy Calhoun have agreed to a one-year contract extension through 2020, according to an announcement today from Director of Athletics Jim Knowlton. The Air Force Academy Athletic Corporation voted unanimously on the extension.

Calhoun completed his ninth season as head coach at Air Force where he has a 67-50 overall and 35-29 in Mountain West play. He has led Air Force to eight bowl games, including a school-record six straight from 2007-12. Calhoun led the Falcons to an 8-6 overall record in 2015 and the Mountain Division championship and first-ever MW title game appearance. The Falcons were 6-2 in conference play this season. Air Force has posted back-to-back undefeated home records and has a school-record 12 game home winning streak.

“Troy Calhoun has been a tremendous leader for our program since coming to his alma mater in 2007, leading the program to eight bowl games in nine years,” Knowlton said. “He has also led the team to exceptional accomplishments off the field and in the classroom. He is a great ambassador for Air Force athletics and we are very excited about Troy’s continued passion to lead our program in the future!”

“Our coaching staff is grateful each morning we drive through the north gate of the grounds of the Air Force Academy to work hip to hip alongside such an incredible faculty, administration and leadership team,” Calhoun said. “The mission is lucidly clear- to help foster and mentor our young men and women into leaders of character.  We are thankful for our service members of yesterday, today and tomorrow, and we have the utmost respect for their dedication to preserve the freedoms of our great country.”


 

 

Calhoun’s players have also been amazingly successful finishing their academic and leadership responsibilities. The Air Force football team’s most recent NCAA APR is an astounding 980 which once again places the Academy amongst the best in the nation in the sport of football. The team has received recognition seven straight seasons.

Calhoun came to his alma mater in 2007 and took over a program that had three straight losing seasons. Air Force finished the 2007 season 9-4 overall and placed second in the Mountain West Conference with a 6-2 mark in Calhoun’s first year. The Falcons earned their first bowl bid in five seasons, advancing to the Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl in Fort Worth, Texas. The five-game turnaround from the previous season was the largest in the nation by a first-year head coach and tied as the third-largest overall in the nation.        

Calhoun was named the conference’s coach of the year for his efforts. In addition, he was named coach of the year in Region 5 by the American Football Coaches Association and was one of eight finalists for national coach of the year honors. Calhoun followed with back-to-back 8-5 overall records and fourth place conference finishes with 5-3 marks in 2008 and 2009. The team earned bids to the Armed Forces Bowl each season and posted the school’s first bowl victory since 2000 with a 47-20 win over Houston in 2009.

In 2010 the Falcons posted a 9-4 overall record and recorded their fourth straight top four conference finish with a 5-3 mark. The Falcons were nationally ranked for the first time since 2003 and posted a victory as a ranked team for the first time since 2002. The team completed 2010 with a 14-7 win over George Tech in 2010 Independence Bowl to earn a second-straight bowl victory.

Air Force posted a 7-6 record in 2011 and qualified for the Military Bowl. The Falcons were 6-7 in 2012 while finishing fourth in the conference with a 5-3 mark. Air Force played in its fourth Armed Forces Bowl to extend the school’s record of consecutive bowl games to six dating back to 2007.

Calhoun led the Falcons to new heights in 2014, posting a 10-3 overall record and a fourth place finish in the Mountain Division with a 5-3 mark. The eight-game turnaround from a 2-10 mark in 2013 is a school record and tied as the best in the nation. The Falcons capped the season with a record 19th Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy and a victory over Western Michigan in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl.

Calhoun brought a wealth of experience and impressive resume at the collegiate and professional levels that is flooded with success at every stop to the Academy. Calhoun came to the Academy after serving as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach for the Houston Texans in 2006. The Texans were one of only two NFL teams to triple their number of wins from the previous year. 

Calhoun became a well-rounded NFL coach, working as a defensive assistant, special teams assistant and offensive assistant with the Denver Broncos from 2003-05. He began his NFL coaching career by serving as the defensive assistant under defensive coordinator Larry Coyer in 2003.

Prior to the NFL, Calhoun was an offensive coordinator for six seasons on the collegiate level. He began his coaching career at Air Force, where he worked as a graduate assistant from 1989-90. He started at quarterback for the Academy in 1986 and was one of only two freshmen to letter for the 1985 team that finished fifth in the final polls with a 12-1 record that included wins over national powers Notre Dame and Texas.

Calhoun served his country from 1989-95 as an active duty officer in the Air Force. He was the Falcons’ recruiting coordinator and the junior varsity offensive coordinator in 1993-94. He moved to Ohio University in 1995 where he served as the quarterbacks coach for two seasons. Calhoun was promoted to offensive coordinator in 1997. Calhoun moved to Wake Forest in 2001 and remained there prior to his stint with the Broncos.

Groomed on the basics of integrity and passion, Calhoun is a native of Roseburg, Ore., and was raised in a home where both kids graduated from the Air Force Academy and were varsity letter winners on nationally-ranked teams. He and his wife, Amanda, live in Colorado Springs and have two children, Tyler (13) and Amelia (11).

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